Difference between revisions of "Martini Glass"

From Chanticleer Society
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==External Links==
 
==External Links==
* [https://www.incollect.com/listings/decorative-arts/tablewares/j-l-lobmeyr-ambassador-set-no-240-martini-glass-by-oswald-haerdtl-399306 "Ambassador" Set No. 240 Martini Glass by Oswald Haerdtl] (Martini glass from 1925 Paris Exposition)
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* [https://www.incollect.com/listings/decorative-arts/tablewares/j-l-lobmeyr-ambassador-set-no-240-martini-glass-by-oswald-haerdtl-399306 "Ambassador" Oswald Haerdtl Martini Glass from 1925] (Oswald Haerdtl Martini glass from 1925 Paris Exposition)
* [https://www.theage.com.au/multimedia/art_deco/pdf/Gill03.pdf Dreams Made Real] (A second "Martini" glass from 1925 Paris Exposition)
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* [https://www.theage.com.au/multimedia/art_deco/pdf/Gill03.pdf Dreams Made Real] (René Lalique Martini glass from 1925 Paris Exposition)
 
* [https://sipsmith.com/the-history-of-the-martini-glass/ History of the Martini Glass] Jared Brown, Sipsmith
 
* [https://sipsmith.com/the-history-of-the-martini-glass/ History of the Martini Glass] Jared Brown, Sipsmith

Revision as of 14:44, 8 January 2021

Oswald Haerdtl Martini Glass from 1925
René Lalique Martini Glass from 1925

Originally, cocktails didn't have a "dedicated" glass. Bartenders would use whatever glassware they felt was appropriate that they had on hand. It wouldn't be until the 1900's that a glass would emerge that would be seen to this day as the quintessential cocktail glass. Today we commonly call that a "Martini Glass" in honor of the drink that typically would have found it as its home.

It is difficult to find exactly when/where this glass first appeared, but there are a few rumors that point to the 1925 Paris Exposition as being the unveiling of the glass which would soon become a Martini Glass. A little searching shows two possible contenders, both in the classic Martini profile, and both from the 1925 Paris Exposition. One is a design by Oswald Haerdtl, which anybody would immediately recognize as an elegant, but standard, Martini glass. The second is by René Lalique, which has a similar profile, but with a decidedly more "art deco" style.

References


External Links