Difference between revisions of "Ding Ho"

From Chanticleer Society
 
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According to Robert:
 
According to Robert:
 
::''I was in "Chopsticks", a little Chinese restaurant near me where they specialize in Trader Vic [[Mai Tai]]'s made from scratch, and I saw he had an unopened bottle of [[St-Germain]] on the back shelf. The owner had no idea what to do with it, just loved the bottle and so he bought it. I decided to try to make them up a "house specialty" cocktail to use it in, and so tried a variation of the Mai Tai... I named it "Ding Ho", since that means in Chinese about the same thing as Mai Tai means in Polynesian.
 
::''I was in "Chopsticks", a little Chinese restaurant near me where they specialize in Trader Vic [[Mai Tai]]'s made from scratch, and I saw he had an unopened bottle of [[St-Germain]] on the back shelf. The owner had no idea what to do with it, just loved the bottle and so he bought it. I decided to try to make them up a "house specialty" cocktail to use it in, and so tried a variation of the Mai Tai... I named it "Ding Ho", since that means in Chinese about the same thing as Mai Tai means in Polynesian.
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[[Category:Sour Recipe]]
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[[Category:Mixed Drink Recipe]]

Latest revision as of 17:13, 9 February 2019

  • 2 oz gin
  • 1/2 oz St-Germain Elderflower Liqueur
  • 1/2 oz orgeat syrup
  • 1/2 oz fresh lime juice

Shake with ice, strain into an ice filled Old Fashioned glass. Garnish with cherry and lime wedge. Serve with straws.

Source: Robert Hess

According to Robert:

I was in "Chopsticks", a little Chinese restaurant near me where they specialize in Trader Vic Mai Tai's made from scratch, and I saw he had an unopened bottle of St-Germain on the back shelf. The owner had no idea what to do with it, just loved the bottle and so he bought it. I decided to try to make them up a "house specialty" cocktail to use it in, and so tried a variation of the Mai Tai... I named it "Ding Ho", since that means in Chinese about the same thing as Mai Tai means in Polynesian.